ELIZABETH KOSTOVA EL RAPTO DEL CISNE PDF

Editorial Reviews. About the Author. Elizabeth Kostova is the author of the international bestseller The Historian. She graduated from Yale and holds an MFA. El Rapto del Cisne [Elizabeth Kostova] on *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers. El rapto del cisne (Spanish Edition) [Elizabeth Kostova] on *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers. El psiquiatra Andrew Marlon se ha dedicado a su.

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El Rapto del Cisne by Elizabeth Kostova. Psychiatrist Andrew Marlow has the cisnw painter Robert Oliver as a pacient. Desperate to understand the secret that tormented the genius, he embarks on a journey taking him closer to the lives of Olivers women and a tragedy at the middle of French Impressionism. The swan thieves is a story of obsession, history losses and the power of art to preserve human hope. Paperbackpages.

Published May 24th by Ediciones Urano first published January 12th To see what your friends thought of this book, please sign up. To ask other readers questions about El Rapto del Cisneplease sign up. However, The Historian is a league apart, a totally different book. I kowtova it from beginning to end, and I’d definitely recommend it even if you didn’t like The Swan Thieves.

Is a page book necessary? Thomas Adcock This is a yr overdue, but, please ask someone to throw a book at you for asking such an absurd question. The length of a book clearly means the author …more This is a yr overdue, tapto, please ask someone to throw a book at you for asking such an absurd question.

Also, Kostova seems to like to explain a lot of things, dsl isn’t either bad or good, depending on your taste elizaberh. But to be frank, and actually answer your question with all deel aside, if the length of the book bothers you, then perhaps read it in pg sections?

I do that when a book I am reading is well over pgs, so it might help. Considering how old this post is, though, I doubt it matters. Lastly, elizaneth you think this is long, read the song of ice and fire books. See all 3 questions about El Rapto del Cisne…. Lists with This Book. This book is not yet featured on Listopia.

I think the reason that this book seems to polarise opinion is because nothing much happens ellzabeth it. Psychologist Robert Marlowe acquires the renowned painter Robert Oliver as his patient, and subsequently travels around meeting people who might be able to shed some light on the reasons behind Oliver’s breakdown.

The majority of the book comprises the memories and insights of these people told in the voice of that particular individual, and so takes place outside the narrative which is really a co I think the reason that this book seems to polarise opinion is because nothing much happens in it. The majority of the book comprises the memories and insights of these people told in the voice of that particular individual, and so takes place outside the narrative which is really a convenient framework for these first person interludes.

This apparently frustrates a lot of people, but it’s what made the book so appealing to me. I thought the author used eliazbeth points of view and writing styles well, blending first person narratives in the past and present tenses, third person narratives in the present tense and letters to create an elaborate whole piece by piece.

Usually this sort kostoga switching irritates me, so it’s a mark of the author’s skill that in cise case I thought it perfectly suited the book.

Each different bit of the writing told me more about the characters and it was this gradual revelation and exploration which made this book such a pleasure to read. View all 10 comments. It has been slizabeth long time since I’ve read a book that made me hungry for the next word, whose pages or so dapto by in an instant, and that after finishing it, I could scarcely breathe and think about anything else for the next few hours.

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Even the day after, I find my mind drifting to the complex plot, the inscrutable and complicated characters and mulling ep the series of events, to see if there could have been any other way the story could have ended, or even begun.

I decided that no, the It has been a long time since I’ve read a rapt that made me hungry for the next word, whose pages or so flew by in an instant, and that after finishing it, I could scarcely breathe and think about anything else for the next few hours.

I decided that no, the ending was as perfect as the beginning and the middle. It came out of nowhere and slapped you across the face with exquisite timing and impeccable, seamless diction.

Every instant of the story was wrapped up cishe the end, but still lent a little mystery to the characters, still leaving you to think afterwards. My only critique is the relationship between Marlow and Mary – should there have been romance?

Is it ethical, considering that Mary recently broke up with Robert Oliver, Marlow’s patient?

Or is this not a case of sloppy plotting, but shrewd planning to bind each of the characters to each other and weave them in the fabric of the story? I do not know. I highly recommend to dek who loves art, psychology and family. Especially to anyone who loves beautifully written books and who is looking for something to catch their eye and make them think afterwards.

View all 5 comments. Kosova think because of that lowish average I went in to this book expecting a little less…but I thought this book was amazing. The whole time I was reading it, I thought, if I was to ever write a book, this is what I would want the voice to sound like. I absolutely loved her use dapto language, her writing style–great detail, but not overdone, beautiful character development with just enough left to the imagination.

El Rapto del Cisne (English, Spanish, Paperback)

Robert was for the reader just as he was for each of the characters who knew him. He was a huge presence without really doing a whole lot to kosyova. Hard to condemn, but hard to like. I came to adore Beatrice de Clerval, as did everyone else apparently. Beatrice was a beautiful woman, with the passion of a great artist, which of course she was.

El rapto del cisne (Spanish Edition): Elizabeth Kostova: : Books

I enjoyed the pace of this book. This tale was a mystery, but realistic. No explosive Hollywood-style occurrences, but a slow unfolding koztova suspicions that are later confirmed.

I liked the parallels to the Greek myth of Leda and the Swan. My cousin Krystle let me borrow elizabwth book, and when she gave it to me she described it as sad but so lovely. View all 3 comments. I just headed over to amazon to pick up a picture for this review, and I was dreading the act of clicking on The Swan Thieves link, because I didn’t want to see how many stars readers had given the book. You see, The Swan Thieves like her previous book, The Historian is one of those novels rl is so gripping that I want to stand on street corners and press copies of it into the hands of passersby.

It’s pages long. I started the book on Sunday morning and finished it this afternoon. I know I just headed over to amazon to pick up a picture for this review, and I was dreading the eliazbeth of clicking on The Swan Thieves link, because I didn’t want to see how many stars readers had given the book.

I know now that many Amazon readers considered it “boring” and “plodding” and “painful” but I found the novel as entertaining as John Grisham and as smart as Ian McEwan, with a liberal sprinkling of French Impressionism thrown in for good measure.

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Robert Oliver, a renowned painter, ends up in a mental hospital after trying to destroy a painting in Washington DC’s National Gallery. Andrew Marlowe, the psychiatrist assigned to Oliver’s care, also happens to be a painter, and although he has a reputation for being able to “make a stone talk” he can’t get Oliver to talk about why he landed in the hospital, so he has to do detective work, which leads him to North Carolina, Mexico, New York City and France, and into relationships with the women, living and long-dead, who shaped Oliver’s consciousness.

Every few months, I come across a book that’s so entertaining I don’t want to put it down. Every few months I come across a book that’s so smart, I’m impressed by the author’s skills as a researcher and writer and want to soak up more of her genius. It’s rare that the smart and the entertaining come together in the same book, but for me, at least The Swan Thieves is the best of both worlds. This is an exquisitely written art history mystery with a difference: Crafted with poise and knowledge of the art period that is arguably the most eventful, The Swan Thieves enthralls on three levels, and is written from a range of perspectives that ring utterly true.

El Rapto del Cisne by Elizabeth Kostova (3 star ratings)

The reader wishes for the book never to end, because the atmosphere is mesmerising and totally engaging. One never doubts the ability of the author, and trust is never a question: Elizabeth Kostova reveals her fascination with the act of painting on her website.

In this book she revels in the ability of art to create shifts and changes in the mind and life of the artist. But not only that: Perhaps the reader is changed as well after reading such a book: The Swan Thieves is the kind of book that has the reader desire to start right over when the end is reached. If readers pick up this book, hoping for a story similar to “The Historian,” they will be disappointed. Personally, I am disappointed by the number of readers criticizing this book for such reasons.

In “The Swan Thieves,” Kostova steps away from ‘another person’s’ story and builds a mesmerizing foundation of mystery and breath-taking narrative s for her readers. The story is a number of character developments amidst an intricate storyline, one filled with historical fact and fiction.

A fourth o If readers pick up this book, hoping for a story similar to “The Historian,” they will be disappointed. A fourth of the way into the book, I knew this was a story I couldn’t wait to finish and yet knew I would dread finishing. Kostova’s inclusion of individual stories, separated – as in “The Historian” – by individual narratives, maintains a tension within the book and expands my curiosity.

Her depth of detail is, again as in “The Historian,” astonishing: Kostova has a way of writing that is as close to the way we picture life as anyone I have read.

At first glance, this book does not seem really exciting because it’s about a painter who attacks a painting and the psychiatrist who tries to figure out what drove him to do it. Andrew Marlow, the psychiatrist, ends up having to go to the women in the painter’s life in order to figure out the mystery because the painter refuses to speak. Kostova’s writing is beautiful and descript Now, I have not read The Historian I do plan on reading it so this was my first exposure to Ms. Kostova’s writing is beautiful and descriptive.

She has a knack for turn of phrase. I am usually a bigger fan of sparse writing that gets a little more to the point, mixed with good dialogue to break the monotony of exposition and description.